SHARING COFFEE CULTURE AND KNOWLEDGE

A Passion for Excellence

A meaningful and comprehensive education in coffee includes many areas of knowledge, including the study of coffee production and processing, the role of coffee in developing countries of origin, coffee’s societal role in creating the culture of cafés and personal rituals, as well as a special focus on the moment of consumption. 
As coffee moves in the consumer’s mind from being a “cup of caffeine” to a highly prized experience,
the quality of the coffee and the precise technical knowledge of the methods of transforming coffee into a spectrum of final products is elevated.

illy Università del caffè (the University of Coffee) has 24 campuses worldwide, and began it’s North American-based Università del caffè in 2008. 

Choose the Ideal Course for You

For professionals, connoisseurs and coffee lovers.

 

UdC Courses

For Professionals and Connoisseurs

For Professionals and Connoisseurs
The Universita del Caffe in North America has partnered with the prestigious International Culinary Center in New York City and the Culinary Institute of America In Napa, CA to offer courses to challenge and satisfy professionals, and all coffee lovers.

Selection

Upon arrival in Trieste, each bag is numbered and prepared for inspection.  The selection process begins as beans are placed on a vibrating screen, a large sieve that separates out foreign matter. A vacuum removes tiny particles, and a magnetic separator removes metallic fragments. Finally, advanced imaging devices "photograph" each bean and eliminate any that are fermented, unripe or otherwise unfit.  Why such intense scrutiny? Because it takes just one imperfect bean in 50 to taint espresso in the cup. illy screens as much as 45 tons of coffee per day.

Blending

illy blends nine distinct Arabica beans before roasting, assuring each bean’s distinct characteristics develop at the same rate under the roaster’s heat. This is precisely how illy achieves remarkable consistency in its blend, can after can.
Blending is truly an art.  Coffees from different origins carry distinct aromas, and varying balances of bitter, sweet and body characteristics.  Nothing less than mastery is required to create a harmonious whole.
Coffee harvests vary year to year, producing different characteristics even in the same bean, so a rigid formula cannot be followed during blending. Understanding how each of the nine beans interacts, and the role each plays is required.  Otherwise said, illy achieves consistency by understanding and embracing diversity, paradoxical as it may sound.  The same result, through different means.  

Roasting

Roasting is coffee’s version of high drama: 15 minutes, the critical time when some 800 substances emerge under heat, each contributing to the taste and aroma of the illy blend—and to its very heritage.

In a large rotating drum, the coffee is brought to about 200°C (392°F), at first drying the beans, turning them golden in color and creating toasted aromas. As roasting continues, the bean’s volume increases by 60 percent, and they begin to turn a light brown. During stage three, beans acquire their familiar rich, brown color, losing about 18% of their weight and becoming brittle. The process must end at precisely the right time. Over-roasting destroys essential, volatile aromatic compounds and upsets the ideal balance of acidity and bitterness.  

Roasting now complete, a critical, calibrated, air-cooling phase goes into effect to literally stop the beans from cooking, keeping aromas intact and preserving the blend at its best.  Beans experience a steady and necessary carbon dioxide loss for days after roasting.

Roasting

Roasting is coffee’s version of high drama: 15 minutes, the critical time when some 800 substances emerge under heat, each contributing to the taste and aroma of the illy blend—and to its very heritage.

In a large rotating drum, the coffee is brought to about 200°C (392°F), at first drying the beans, turning them golden in color and creating toasted aromas. As roasting continues, the bean’s volume increases by 60 percent, and they begin to turn a light brown. During stage three, beans acquire their familiar rich, brown color, losing about 18% of their weight and becoming brittle. The process must end at precisely the right time. Over-roasting destroys essential, volatile aromatic compounds and upsets the ideal balance of acidity and bitterness.  

Roasting now complete, a critical, calibrated, air-cooling phase goes into effect to literally stop the beans from cooking, keeping aromas intact and preserving the blend at its best.  Beans experience a steady and necessary carbon dioxide loss for days after roasting.

1995

X1: design e tecnologia per l’espresso

60 anni dopo Illetta, il nipote Francesco Illy fonda Francis Francis! e crea la X1 per l’espresso a casa: ancora oggi un’icona di stile.

1996

James Rosenquist e il nuovo logo

60 anni dopo la illetta nasce la Francis Francis, azienda produttrice di macchine espresso per la casa, orientata al design funzionale alla migliore tecnologia. La x1, prima nata, è ancora oggi icona di stile.