Támara

Colombia

We are in the region of Casanare, the largest of Colombia’s 32 departments. Surrounded by high mountains, this area has a plentiful supply of water, which is now being preserved thanks to sustainable farming practices, and is inhabited by a diverse population of animal species. Coffee was brought to this region in 1750 by Jesuit priests, and immediately flourished. The village of Támara stands at a high altitude, not far from a vast plain and highland area.

The traditional slate houses with wooden roofs still exist today. The coffee plants are concealed under the shade of the tall banana and plane trees. Ask the local people what their secret is and they’ll tell you that what makes their coffee so special is the composition of the soil and the altitude of 1400 m in which the plantations flourish. But most important of all is the light that bathes the plants, and the birdsong that cheers them. A combination that only this part of the world seems to offer.

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Samuel Higuera

Colombia

monoarabica Samuel Higuera
Name:
Samuel Higuera
Territory:
Támara
illy since:
2000

“This land is too expensive” said his father. But Samuel didn’t listen. He was almost 30 years old and had learnt everything there was to know about coffee from his family’s plantation. He felt ready to take a personal risk, and begin life as a coffee grower…
So began the adventure of Samuel Higuera, more than 40 years ago in the region of Támara in Colombia. Today that field (which perhaps did cost too much) and the other inherited plantations, are the strength of Samuel, who for some time has been a member of the local cooperative that gives local coffee growers direct access to the market.

Here, time seems to have stopped: from Samuel’s house you can still see the colonial-style buildings and typical slate and wooden constructions. Just a little higher, on the mountain slopes, grows the fine Arabica of Támara.
The coffee-growing community is close-knit, deeply attached to its traditions and profoundly linked to the soil. A legacy that is blessed, like the hands that cultivate the plants. This is partly why the people do so much to protect and preserve the plants.
Here, it is said that coffee is a love affair: many couples work together in the plantation. While the men perform the harder physical tasks, the women provide valuable assistance in harvesting the ripe coffee cherries. Samuel is happy to provide jobs for so many women. He believes that it’s their cheerful voices and the festive atmosphere they bring that help to make his coffee even better.